Medical Practice

Medicine doctor hand working with modern computer interface

Every clinician has their own personal practice style, and every medical office their unique drama. When seeing patients, Dr. Ted Pit Olee’gi preferred sitting more than standing, except on occasion when both feet felt like six-month-old chocolate cookies. Do not place any blame on Dr. Ted. For three decades, those pincers have carried a 158-pound weight in a 5 ft 7 inches frame.

To the left of a short corridor is the entrance door to Dr. Ted’s exam room. Upon entry, patients glimpse a black swivel chair located at the center of the office. In front of the black spinning chair is a brown desktop, which only has room for a mouse tucked behind a Lifebook tablet PC.

Diagonal to the laptop and resting on the back wall are two black chairs, with padded backrests. When he is seated, Dr. Ted’s extended right hand can reach for syringes, Band-Aids and tongue depressors from a six-door cabinet hung on the side wall. A motion-activated hand sanitizer dispenser is screwed to the mid section of the cabinet.

Patients who require abdominal palpation lie down on a brown examination table against the wall to the left of Dr. Ted when he sits on his black swivel chair. An apparatus for weight and height measurement occupies part of the space between the doorway and the exam couch.
Read More

Categories: Medicine